Seven Surprising Side Effects from Switzerland – IT Integration Strategy with Nexthink

In our year-long mission so far amongst the IT teams of some of the best known global legal firms, we are often surprised by the unexpected feedback we receive when we present Nexthink, the fastest way to good digital experience management. We were familiar with feedback such as "this could turn our service support team into heroes", and " we had no idea how little-used our new business messaging service had been adopted by our users, until we undertook the Proof of Value exercise with you". One use case we hadn't heard before was an interesting twist on an understood use case very common in the Legal Profession - use of Nexthink to audit the readiness of an acquired companies' IT infrastructure integration into the core environment.  The twist is that this was undertaken proactively by the IT team under acquisition, rather than the acquiring company. Let's take a look at the nuts and bolts of this, the first of seven blogs illustrating...
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is the law ready for true digital interaction

Some thoughts from our colleague, Chris Jones at Icon UK, which we'd wholeheartedly echo.  Over the next month or two, we will be exploring this with our customers in the legal sector, and will come back with their feedback and views.. Lord Briggs and other Supreme Court judges advocate the intelligent use of technology to bring the justice system within economic reach of all citizens and to speed the efficient processing and resolution of cases.  Yet too many practicing lawyers/solicitors are unaware of the possibilities and are often unsure if they start engaging with these technologies whether or not they would be contravening Law Society guidelines. We see that it is in no-ones interest for such ambiguities to exist, particularly as the legal sector strives to modernise a wide variety of practices. We would welcome a discussion with the relevant Policy and Practice Head(s) to clarify some specifics, both from policy and member communication perspectives. Specifically, there are two technology types that...
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User-centricity; the new focus for IT service provision

We've spent the last couple of months exploring some of issues of concern to IT functions in the legal sector. Here are some of them: Legal firms are very acquisitive, and usually expand through mergers or wholesale onboarding of another firms' sector practice. This means that large cohorts of devices, networks, associated data and systems often need to be incorporated, merged, or at least coherently managed. The lack of availability of a service or source of information can vary from the trivial/inconvenient, through to reputationally harmful and up to being critically damaging to the legal firm. The move towards the cloud-like service provision is especially complex for legal IT service leaders: clients often mandate the collaborative systems to use, and have their own policies for data location, collaboration and access. IT (especially the helpdesk) are often seen as a necessary evil, and not particularly helpful in resolving an IT issue. This is a painful fact to IT support managers, who may be incentivised through...
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